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3D Maximum Pixel Intensity Image (MIP) in a patient with Breast Cancer

GE Advance PET scanner


Patient Preparation:
Oncology and Cardiac


1.
Address claustrophobia issues-sedatives are NOT provided by the Division of Nuclear Medicine.
2. Fast for >6 hours prior to study
3. No chewing gum 6 hours prior to study
4. No strenuous exercise 24 hours prior to study
5. Drink plenty of water prior to study (this reduces radiation exposure)
6. Be on time (the tracer has a short half-life-there may not be enough left to perform the study if the patient is late)

Seizure Patients

1. Address claustrophobia issues-sedatives are NOT provided by the Division of Nuclear Medicine. Patients can take their own prescribed medication
2. No chewing gum 4-6 hours prior to study
3. No strenuous exercise 24 hours prior to study
4. Drink plenty of water prior to study (this reduces radiation exposure)
5. Be on time (the tracer has a short half-life-there may not be enough left to perform the study if the patient is late)


 

  Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET is rapidly becoming an integral tool in the diagnosis and staging of many malignancies. Currently, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMMS, formerly HCFA) has approved reimbursement for Lung cancer, Esophageal cancer, Melanoma, Colorectal cancer, Head and Neck cancers and Lymphoma, with the expectation that Breast Cancer will be covered in July of 2002. Non-oncologic reimbursable studies include localization of seizure foci and evaluation of myocardial perfusion (Rb-82) and viability (F-18 FDG).

F-18 FDG is a glucose analog that is irreversibly trapped in cells that are metabolically active. The amount of F-18 accumulation is proportional to the rate of glucose metabolism.  Most tumors have a higher rate of metabolism than normal tissue and therefore higher accumulation of F-18 FDG.  Whole body PET imaging of F-18 FDG distribution provides a mechanism for detection of primary tumor and possible metastatic sites.  A PET study with F-18 FDG generally requires the patient to be imaged for 35-45 minutes.

The VCU Molecular Imaging Center has a General Electric whole body PET/CT scanner (Discovery LS GE Medical Systems). It is a full ring high spatial resolution and high sensitivity dedicated BGO scanner with a state-of-the art integrated sixteen slice CT. The CT provides improved attenuation correction for the PET data set and enhanced clinical interpretation with fusion of the anatomical CT images with the functional PET images. The bore is 60 cm and the field of view is 15 cm with a total scannable range of 165 cm. It can accommodate patients up to 425lbs (with <60 cm diameter). Data is acquired in either 2D (whole body) or 3D (brain) volumes. The reconstructed image resolution is in the range of 6-7 mm.

Routine PET imaging studies can be requested through usual ordering pathways.  For oncology studies, it is essential that the patient fast 4-6 hours prior to the study.  Studies will be CANCELED and rescheduled for patients who have consumed products containing sugar.

Molecular Imaging Applications

PET has an integral role in the imaging of biomolecular processes.  This is accomplished by labeling biomolecules with positron-emitting radionuclides.  These labeled probes can be used to image normal physiology or disease processes. Many such probes are currently being developed.  During the first months of MIC operation, only F-18 labeled compounds will be routinely used.  Future plans include the routine use of other radiotracers such as O-15 water (for blood flow), C-11 carbon dioxide (for blood pool), and N-13 ammonia (for perfusion).  

For more information on PET imaging contact:
Karen A. Kurdziel, M.D.
Medical Director by email kurdziel@hsc.vcu.edu or
by phone 804-827-4984


 

vcu home page For site related issues contact: Karen A. Kurdziel, MD
For general information contact:
Kristin Schmidt
Tel: 804.828.4178 | Fax: 804.828.6129
1200 E. Marshall St, Richmond, VA 23298

Last Updated August 29, 2006
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